Free access to breaking news is sponsored by Dorsett Automotive

If you're interested in submitting a Letter to the Editor, click here.

During the Spanish Flu pandemic a century ago, Indiana Gov. James P. Goodrich and President Woodrow Wilson barely played a role in the public response, despite the fact that it killed an estimated 10,000 Hoosiers.

When told to wear face masks two COVID-plagued winters ago, we thought: "Can't wait until this is over and we no longer have to wear a piece of cloth over our mouth and nose. It's ugly. It interferes with breathing. It muffles voices and makes some conversations hard to follow."

There was a mouse running around the Wolfsie kitchen. Then it was in the basement. Then in the storeroom. Angel, the cat, knows it. And my wife knows it. We’re just trying to hide it from the neighbors.

Your odds of being killed in a car crash are one in 102; being struck by lightning, one in 15,300; dying in a plane crash, one in 205,000; being eaten by a shark, one in 4 million; or dying in a tornado, one in 5.6 million.

As I shuffle along in my 75th year of life, I have a few regrets. First, I wish I had learned to be fluent in another language.

A U.S. House special election in Louisiana just delivered victory to another Democratic moderate. Troy Carter defeated Karen Carter Peterson, who ran well to his left. Both candidates are state senators.

Finland is the world's happiest country — fourth year in a row! So says the World Happiness Report, produced by the United Nations Sustainable Development Solutions Network. The United States ranks 14th, right behind Ireland and ahead of Canada.

For most of us waking up last Friday morning, the news that eight Hoosiers had been killed in a massacre at a FedEx facility wasn’t so much a surprise, as a “shock” that it had finally happened here.

It’s so easy, in the course of our day-to-day lives, to get caught up in the political preoccupations of the moment.

This Week's Circulars