News From Terre Haute, Indiana

October 27, 2013

Redneck Quaker: Hunters Helping Hunters big boost for handicapped who love outdoors

Kenny Bayless
Special to the Tribune-Star

TERRE HAUTE — Hunters Helping Hunters’ mission is to improve the quality of life for physically challenged and seriously ill hunters. This is accomplished by providing hunting opportunities to those who would not otherwise have the ability or resources to fulfill outdoor adventures.

We are going to Alamo to get this story, not the Alamo in Texas, but Alamo, Ind.

It is tucked away in the flatlands of central Indiana, not far from Wallace. Yes, I know you’re saying: “Where to heck is Wallace?”

Scott Stockwell and Pat Walker may be the backbone of this wonderful organization, but it’s about the desire and needs of unfortunate folks.

A lot of planning and dedication go into setting up a hunt for the disabled. If a person is not very mobile, he/she may hunt on a natural food plot that draws in animals. A hunting blind is set up that is accessible by a wheelchair or other devices.

Special devices to help hold a gun or bow will be built to aid the person. Disabled hunters pay their dues the same as anybody else by sitting in wait for hours or days in all types of weather to get that shot on ducks, deer, geese, turkey, pheasant and bear. The wild game they take is the icing on the cake. The companionship and just being out in nature is as rewarding as taking that buck.

Hunters Helping Hunters is a nonprofit corporation. Folks with good health cannot comprehend how much the disabled appreciate a helping hand to do the things they love the most.

In 2001, five avid hunters started this cause and incorporated it in 2003. Everything is paid for from donations. They have supported about 300 hunters to date.

They accept applications from folks nationwide. A 14-year-old boy took a buck on the last day of the season with his father, who had never hunted. Words can’t express the bonding gratification along with the achievement of the hunt and the pride of the father for his son.

A background check is done to meet special requirements, and the ones with the least opportunity go first.

They are all free-ranged hunts; nothing is fenced in or staged.

Six-per-year hunt deer in the Central Indiana region and 17 in the Auburn region. Most blinds are elevated, but not all.

All the hunters have to do is get to the designated hotel and they are taken care of from there with transportation, meals, guns, food and game processing.

For more information go to www.huntershelpinghunters.org or call Scott Stockwell at 812-236-3723.

• Quail Forever — The great folks from Quail Forever Organization are having a youth hunt on Nov. 30 at the Prairie Grove Hunting preserve.

Registration starts at 9 a.m. The actual hunt starts 10 a.m. You have to be 12 to 18 years of age and be accompanied by an adult.

Quail, chucker partridge and pheasant will be in your gun sights. You don’t have to possess a hunting license because it is a free hunt day from the DNR. Lunch is free as well as shotgun shells, and they will even furnish a gun if needed. You have to wear a hat or vest or both in hunter orange.

Prairie Grove is open to the public, offering a great time making memories while hunting wild game. They are running a special on 15 pheasants for $250. To book a hunt, give Jim Jacob a call at 812-208-4283. The address is 2768 N. County Road 425 West, Brazil, IN 47834.

For more info on the youth hunt, call Paul Bridgewater on at 812-251-3636. Paul has a heart of gold for the kids and other members.

• Ladies Hunt — Nov. 16 will be a Ladies Hunt at the Buck Creek Hunting Preserve South in Marshall, Ill. The hunt begins at 10 a.m. Eastern time. Pheasant and chucker will be offered, so practice up for that fast shooting. Don’t forget to stop at Walmart in Marshall to get your preserve hunting license which is $12.75. Don’t forget your hunter orange vest or hat too.

For more info, call Bridgewater at 812-251-3636.