News From Terre Haute, Indiana

May 12, 2012

Rub of the Green: Bowling or golf? Both provide plenty of challenge

Bob Arnett
Special to the Tribune-Star

TERRE HAUTE — The question has been raised in the past, is it bowling or golf that is the more difficult endeavor?

We asked the opinion of Darrell Davis, a retired air traffic controller at Hulman Field. Davis has rolled no fewer than 46 perfect 300 games, many of which translated to tournament victories.

Recently, Darrell had bowled 10 strikes in a row on his final game when the tournament manager appeared with a large trophy in his hand along with a $500 check. Davis then made a pair strikes and notched another tournament win.

During 2011, Darrell turned his interests to golf. Playing on the Golfweek Amateur Tour, he won five times which included Division D wins at Prairie View, Timbergate, Hickory Stick, Deer Creek and Brickyard Crossing. A knee injury cut his season short.

Later a shoulder problem threatened to sabotage his 2012 comeback, but a win at The Golf Club of Indiana demonstrated that he was ready for the coming season with one exception. He has been moved up from division “D” to division “B”, and this year his opposition will be much stronger.

The handicaps of Division D entrants will range from 9 to 13.9. Tournament courses will include: Coyote Crossing, The Legends, Brickyard Crossing, Heartland Crossing, Hickory Stick, Bear Slide and Trophy Club. Hilton Head will be the site of the Tour Championship.

Membership in the Golfweek Amateur Golf Tour is open to every one of all ages and skill levels.

This doesn’t bother Darrell in the least. He indicates, “I love the competition and I really enjoy the different courses we have the opportunity to play.” He adds, “I don’t think there is any question that golf is by far a more difficult sport than bowling.” He went on to say, “In golf you encounter different problems on each hole that must be taken into consideration.

Bowling alleys are all the same length. Few adjustments are required to determine how the alley will respond to a bowler’s delivery.”

Regardless of an individual’s preference, both golf and bowling are extremely popular sports for those who enjoy indulging in both activities.

Darrell Davis and his wife, Carol, are perfect examples. Carol Davis carries a 202 bowling average. In addition, she is the first lady golfer to sign up for Golfweek’s Amateur Tour.

Both Darrell and Carol are members of the Greater Terre Haute Bowling Hall of Fame.

Darrell is the recipient of one hole-in-one, an ace on the 13th hole at Oak Ridge.

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Arley Andrews and his wife, Carolyn, were recently spotted at Rod O’Kelly’s Boot City, taking in some great Western music that has been popular through the ages.

Arley, his twin brother, Harley and their uncle Harold combined for a Gerstmeyer Tech quintet that came “Oh so close” to a state high school basketball championship back in the 1950s.

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Jake Peacock, former West Vigo golfer, has moved up to the first assistant’s job at Pebble Brook Golf Club in Noblesville. Jake has spent his last two summers at Victoria National and this winter he was at Desert Forest in Scottsdale, Ariz.

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Ryne Ruddock holed his 8 iron recently on No. 8 at River Bend at the Landing. Witnessing his perfect shot were his father, Tom, Jim Craig and Mike Harden.

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All mothers play free today at The Landing in celebration of Mothers’ Day, May 13, 2012.

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This writer was fortunate to have had an outstanding mother who pushed her son through six years of college. Although my father died when I was eleven years old, my mother was superb in the manner in which she raised her fatherless son. Anything I have achieved on or off the golf course, I owe to Mabel Wills Arnett. Truly she was a superlative mother.

n Tip of the week — In today’s age of “pounding the cover off the golf ball”, amateurs need to know how to hit a safe shot, one they know will not get them in trouble or sail out of bounds. To do this a player must find a safe slower swing speed, one that can be counted on consistently.

Swinging at a golf ball and striking it with 100% of your strength is definitely a recipe for disaster. If you throttle back to 75% of the force required, you will not only hit more consistent shots, you will avoid many of the injuries that of plague golfers.

Keep your head down and your shoestrings tied. We’ll be back.