News From Terre Haute, Indiana

February 18, 2013

READERS’ FORUM: Feb. 18, 2013

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Be happy that militias exist

This is in response to Walt Moore’s letter that appeared on Sunday, Feb. 3, “Local militias have positive histories.” First off, I’d like to say thank you, Mr. Moore, for a very truthful and informative commentary. Great work.

I believe his letter brought to light some very informative and valid issues. Who is the militia, you may ask? They are your farmers, lawyers, doctors, truck drivers, they are your next-door neighbors. They are American citizens willing to stand up against any form of tyrannical oppression.

Despite what you hear about militias through the mainstream media, they are not a government over-throwing, radical-motivated organization. If you would like to find the truth about the militia, I suggest you go to the following website: indianamilitia.org. With the direction that our country is taking, I for one am glad to know we have militias. In case your head has been in the sand, socialism is a very real and growing reality in our country.

Don’t believe it? Look no further than Obamacare and read the fine print. Now they are starting to go after our guns … again. I don’t know about you, but I find it a bit odd that we’ve had all of these terrible shootings before and after the elections. Just a thought.

Oh yeah, it’s also now illegal to buy or sell a certain size soft drink in New York City. Why? Because their mayor made it a law. They need a good, common-sense mayor such as Mayor Duke Bennett of Terre Haute.

The government can paint a pretty picture to the people, but what is really and truly going on behind our backs? You don’t have to look very far. You would be amazed to say the least. As Mr. Moore pointed out, look what happened when Adolf Hitler and his 1,000-year Reich stormed across Europe.

Let us, as Americans, not let that happen here in this great country we call America. Wake up, America. Be safe, be vigilant.

— Paul Abel

Shelburn

Thanks for great Swope fundraiser

On Saturday, Feb. 9, the Swope Art Museum celebrated Mardi Gras, an evening of revelry and fun that included dancing, fortune telling, food and drink, special masks and beads, and a photo booth from Roxy Studio.

This special event is one of the museum’s most successful fundraisers, bringing not only good cheer that evening but also support for the many programs and exhibitions that the Swope presents free of charge throughout the year. Mardi Gras was made possible by Indiana American Water, which has generously sponsored it for the past three years.

Special thanks go to the Art Hoppers, a remarkable and devoted volunteer group of dynamic young professionals and families who are dedicated to supporting the Swope Art Museum through special events such as Mardi Gras and through organizing our free Family Day program, family art-making activities offered on selected Saturdays during the year.

Many in-kind contributions also make Mardi Gras possible, including donations from Lamar Advertising, WilliamsRandall Marketing, J. Gumbo’s, Elements Salon & Spa, 105.5 The River, and from Hardwood Renovations, which recently beautifully repaired and restored the floor on the museum’s third floor.

Each year, a new king and queen are elected during Mardi Gras, chosen by both their tireless efforts at raising money on behalf of the museum and their winning votes at the event. The extraordinary success of Mardi Gras would not be possible without the hard work of these individuals on behalf of the museum.

We are very grateful to 2013 candidates Gary Greiner, Yvette Hernandez, Candi Snyder, Whitney Völkl, Brent Wells and John Wilkinson for their remarkable and enthusiastic support of the Swope and to the many individuals and business who supported their respective campaigns.

Congratulations and heartfelt thanks to Gary and Whitney, the 2013 Mardi Gras King and Queen and to all the candidates for making this event so outstanding.

— Rick Shagley, president

Board of Managers

— Jon Ford, president

Board of Overseers

— Marianne Richter,

executive director


Swope Art Museum

League celebrates 93rd anniversary

The League of Women Voters was elated to celebrate our 93rd anniversary on Feb. 14. Since our founding in 1920, the league has worked tirelessly to protect and uphold the constitutional right to vote, a right that composes the very foundation of our democracy.

However, while we celebrate our successes, we are concerned by stark challenges to our democracy. In the upcoming Supreme Court case Shelby County, Alabama v. Holder, the constitutionality of the Voting Rights Act (VRA) of 1965 will be reviewed. The VRA is landmark legislation that ensures every American citizen, regardless of race, has an equal right to vote. Should the Court rule against the VRA, which prevents states from passing discriminatory voting rules, the right to vote for millions of Americans would be at risk.

The league has been committed to protecting voter rights since 1920, and we’re not stopping now. The upcoming Supreme  Court review of the Voting Rights Act shows that even 93 years after our founding, the league’s work is needed more than ever.

The League of Women Voters of Vigo County is one of nearly 800 leagues in all 50 states that works to protect voters’ rights. In fact, Indiana welcomes a brand new league — LWV of South Central Indiana. Since 1920, the league has worked to educate and inform voters. We respect all points of view, and never support or oppose candidates for office, or political parties. This is what sets us apart from so many organizations, and it is why we welcome new volunteers to take part in our work here in Terre Haute and Vigo County.

Membership in the league is open to men and women of all ages. For more information about the league, visit the League of Women Voters of Vigo County, IN Facebook page.

The league’s next event will be the monthly co-sponsored Crackerbarrel with state legislators, held at the Vigo County Public Library, on March 9, from 10 a.m. until noon.

— Carolyn Callecod

Terre Haute



Be happy that

militias exist

This is in response to Walt Moore’s letter that appeared on Sunday, Feb. 3, “Local militias have positive histories.” First off, I’d like to say thank you, Mr. Moore, for a very truthful and informative commentary. Great work.

I believe his letter brought to light some very informative and valid issues. Who is the militia, you may ask? They are your farmers, lawyers, doctors, truck drivers, they are your next-door neighbors. They are American citizens willing to stand up against any form of tyrannical oppression.

Despite what you hear about militias through the mainstream media, they are not a government over-throwing, radical-motivated organization. If you would like to find the truth about the militia, I suggest you go to the following website: indianamilitia.org. With the direction that our country is taking, I for one am glad to know we have militias. In case your head has been in the sand, socialism is a very real and growing reality in our country.

Don’t believe it? Look no further than Obamacare and read the fine print. Now they are starting to go after our guns … again. I don’t know about you, but I find it a bit odd that we’ve had all of these terrible shootings before and after the elections. Just a thought.

Oh yeah, it’s also now illegal to buy or sell a certain size soft drink in New York City. Why? Because their mayor made it a law. They need a good, common-sense mayor such as Mayor Duke Bennett of Terre Haute.

The government can paint a pretty picture to the people, but what is really and truly going on behind our backs? You don’t have to look very far. You would be amazed to say the least. As Mr. Moore pointed out, look what happened when Adolf Hitler and his 1,000-year Reich stormed across Europe.

Let us, as Americans, not let that happen here in this great country we call America. Wake up, America. Be safe, be vigilant.

— Paul Abel

Shelburn

Thanks for great

Swope fundraiser

On Saturday, Feb. 9, the Swope Art Museum celebrated Mardi Gras, an evening of revelry and fun that included dancing, fortune telling, food and drink, special masks and beads, and a photo booth from Roxy Studio.

This special event is one of the museum’s most successful fundraisers, bringing not only good cheer that evening but also support for the many programs and exhibitions that the Swope presents free of charge throughout the year. Mardi Gras was made possible by Indiana American Water, which has generously sponsored it for the past three years.

Special thanks go to the Art Hoppers, a remarkable and devoted volunteer group of dynamic young professionals and families who are dedicated to supporting the Swope Art Museum through special events such as Mardi Gras and through organizing our free Family Day program, family art-making activities offered on selected Saturdays during the year.

Many in-kind contributions also make Mardi Gras possible, including donations from Lamar Advertising, WilliamsRandall Marketing, J. Gumbo’s, Elements Salon & Spa, 105.5 The River, and from Hardwood Renovations, which recently beautifully repaired and restored the floor on the museum’s third floor.

Each year, a new king and queen are elected during Mardi Gras, chosen by both their tireless efforts at raising money on behalf of the museum and their winning votes at the event. The extraordinary success of Mardi Gras would not be possible without the hard work of these individuals on behalf of the museum.

We are very grateful to 2013 candidates Gary Greiner, Yvette Hernandez, Candi Snyder, Whitney Völkl, Brent Wells and John Wilkinson for their remarkable and enthusiastic support of the Swope and to the many individuals and business who supported their respective campaigns.

Congratulations and heartfelt thanks to Gary and Whitney, the 2013 Mardi Gras King and Queen and to all the candidates for making this event so outstanding.

— Rick Shagley, president

Board of Managers

— Jon Ford, president

Board of Overseers

— Marianne Richter,

executive director

Swope Art Museum

League celebrates 93rd anniversary

The League of Women Voters was elated to celebrate our 93rd anniversary on Feb. 14. Since our founding in 1920, the league has worked tirelessly to protect and uphold the constitutional right to vote, a right that composes the very foundation of our democracy.

However, while we celebrate our successes, we are concerned by stark challenges to our democracy. In the upcoming Supreme Court case Shelby County, Alabama v. Holder, the constitutionality of the Voting Rights Act (VRA) of 1965 will be reviewed. The VRA is landmark legislation that ensures every American citizen, regardless of race, has an equal right to vote. Should the Court rule against the VRA, which prevents states from passing discriminatory voting rules, the right to vote for millions of Americans would be at risk.

The league has been committed to protecting voter rights since 1920, and we’re not stopping now. The upcoming Supreme  Court review of the Voting Rights Act shows that even 93 years after our founding, the league’s work is needed more than ever.

The League of Women Voters of Vigo County is one of nearly 800 leagues in all 50 states that works to protect voters’ rights. In fact, Indiana welcomes a brand new league — LWV of South Central Indiana. Since 1920, the league has worked to educate and inform voters. We respect all points of view, and never support or oppose candidates for office, or political parties. This is what sets us apart from so many organizations, and it is why we welcome new volunteers to take part in our work here in Terre Haute and Vigo County.

Membership in the league is open to men and women of all ages. For more information about the league, visit the League of Women Voters of Vigo County, IN Facebook page.

The league’s next event will be the monthly co-sponsored Crackerbarrel with state legislators, held at the Vigo County Public Library, on March 9, from 10 a.m. until noon.

— Carolyn Callecod

Terre Haute