News From Terre Haute, Indiana

April 12, 2013

READERS' FORUM: April 12, 2013


The Tribune-Star

---- — Donating helps save the earth

As our community prepares to mark Earth Day once again this April 22, the environmental movement has become more and more difficult for everyday people to navigate: a maze of climate change, carbon offsets, emissions guidelines and more.

While these big-picture issues can often seem far removed from everyday life, Wabash Valley Goodwill Industries encourages consumers to remember the widespread impact from one simple act: donating goods.

For 86 years, Wabash Valley Goodwill has been an environmental pioneer of the “reduce, reuse, repurpose” practice, diverting more than 4 million pounds of clothing and household goods from landfills every year. In 2010, Goodwill Industries launched the Donate Movement, a public awareness platform that lets people calculate the social impact of their own clothing and household item donations.

The Donate Movement website also offers consumers a step-by-step guide on how to organize a donation drive at a campus, school or other location, gives bloggers the opportunity to raise awareness by joining the Donate Movement Network, and provides resources on where to bring used goods for donation.

On Earth Day this year, don’t forget that small actions can still have a big impact. To find the donation site nearest you visit goodwill.org and join the Donate Movement.

— Bill Tennis

Executive Director

Wabash Valley Goodwill Industries

Terre Haute

Think about the cancer industry

I have much more experience than I like in cancer treatment facilities. After seeing the cancer-treating mausoleums, the huge payrolls, people rushing to and fro, spending billions of dollars on cancer research, does it make you wonder (maybe a little bit) if the upper medical establishment really wants to cure cancer.

In my lifetime, the only two serious diseases that I know of being cured or prevented is polio and ulcers. Polio was prevented by the research of Dr. Jonas Salk, and a chap from Australia proved that most ulcers were caused by bacterial infection and treatable with antibiotics. These are not billion-dollar foundations, but dedicated persons solving serious illnesses.

Surgery has kept me alive, but the magic pill for all cancers is not even on the horizon, although that has been the monthly headline for over 50 years.

Think about this, If cancer was cured tomorrow, thousands of skilled employees would be unemployed, empty buildings, tons of unusable medical devices, unsold BMWs, and the list goes on and on.

I didn’t say it was true. I just said think about it.

— Sam Wallace

Casey, Ill.