News From Terre Haute, Indiana

Opinion

March 29, 2014

FLASHPOINT: Justice system needs both sides represented in court

TERRE HAUTE — Several same-sex couples recently filed lawsuits seeking to strike down Indiana’s traditional marriage definition law. As Indiana attorney general, I have been asked why my office is defending the statute in court when some AGs in other states are not defending their states’ traditional marriage laws from similar lawsuits. I explain that I took an oath to represent and defend Indiana’s state government and its existing statutes. I don’t make the laws — that’s the Legislature’s job — but I have a solemn obligation to defend those laws while there is a good-faith defense, and I cannot shirk my duty nor abdicate that responsibility to others.

This is not personal advocacy on my part or by the lawyers who work in my office. Whenever the State of Indiana is sued, you — the taxpayers and citizens of the state — are really being sued collectively, and you are entitled to counsel. The correct course of action is for the attorney general to provide a good-faith defense — within the resources already available — until and unless the U.S. Supreme Court decides to the contrary. The justice system cannot work if one side is not represented by counsel or if the attorneys presume that they are judge and jury in their own cases and fail to zealously advocate for their clients.

Some have asked if in providing this defense I am on “the wrong side of history.” They note my counterpart, the Kentucky attorney general, recently announced he no longer would defend his state’s traditional marriage definition. But even he defended his state’s marriage law at the federal district court stage, and his decision not to continue representing his state’s position on appeal does not mean the law will go undefended. Instead, the Kentucky governor had to hire outside counsel to defend the statute in court. Was the Kentucky attorney general on the “wrong side of history” when he represented his client, but suddenly on the “right side of history” when outside lawyers were called in at significant cost to Kentucky taxpayers to do so?

Unlike Kentucky, Indiana does not need outside counsel to defend its own duly-enacted laws the Legislature passed. My office can do so readily within our existing budget, approved by the Legislature in advance, using our own salaried attorneys who do not charge billable hours and who would be paid the same whether these lawsuits were filed or not.

It’s worth noting what happened in California where the Proposition 8 constitutional amendment defined marriage in the traditional way. When that definition was challenged in federal court, California’s attorney general declined to mount any legal defense. When the U.S. Supreme Court heard the Proposition 8 case last year, it ruled that because the law was not defended by the State of California, the law’s private defenders lacked legal standing, and there could be no conclusive ruling on Proposition 8’s constitutionality. That left the question of state-level marriage definitions muddled and left our nation in suspense. How exactly is the lack of a legal defense on the “right side of history”?

My office will defend an Indiana statute, as we do every day in numerous cases, as long as a good-faith defense exists — and with the marriage definition law, it still does. Indiana courts previously have upheld Indiana’s marriage law, and the U.S. Supreme Court has previously permitted states to license marriage as between one man and one woman. While there are various challenges of multiple states’ laws now working their way through the federal appeals court pipeline, until and unless the U.S. Supreme Court rules otherwise, the State of Indiana has the right and obligation to enforce its longstanding statute and defend it from plaintiffs’ lawyers.  

When plaintiffs challenge statutes, I never complain; federal courts exist to decide such questions. I hope that Hoosiers on all sides of this controversial issue will show civility and respect toward each other while the court does its work.

But when two opposing attorneys represent their clients to the best of their skill and ability, neither lawyer is by virtue of their courtroom role on the “wrong” side of history. Both serve as advocates before the court that makes the rulings that ultimately make the history. When we lawyers take an oath to represent our client, we can’t shirk our duty.

1
Text Only | Photo Reprints
Opinion
Latest News
TribStar.com Poll
AP Video
Rodents Rampant in Gardens Around Louvre Raw: 2 Shells Hit Fuel Tank at Gaza Power Plant Raw: Massive Explosions From Airstrikes in Gaza US Ready to Slap New Sanctions on Russia Looming Demand Could Undercut Flight Safety Girl Struck by Plane on Florida Beach Dies Giant Ketchup Bottle Water Tower Up for Sale Easier Nuclear Construction Promises Fall Short House to Vote on Slimmed-down Bill for Border Raw: Earthquake Rocks Mexico's Gulf Coast Kerry: Not Worried About Israeli Criticism Boater Rescued From Edge of Kentucky Dam Kerry: Humanitarian Cease-fire Efforts Continue Judge OKs Record-setting $2B Sale of Clipper Mother of 2 Makes NFL Cheerleading Squad at 40 Raw: Massive Dust Storm Covers Phoenix Fox Dons 'Bondage Strap' Skirt at Comic-Con Today in History for July 29th Raw: Airstrike Shatters Fragile Calm in Gaza Deadly Ebola Virus Threatens West Africa
NDN Video
Weird 'Wakudoki' Dance Launches Promotional Competition Two women barely avoid being hit by train Chris Pratt Adorably Surprises Kids at a 'Guardians of the Galaxy' Screening Chapter Two: Designing for Naomi Watts NOW TRENDING: Peyton Manning dancing at practice "The Bachelorette" Makes Her Decision Thieves pick the wrong gas station to rob Golden Sisters on '50 Shades' trailer: 'Look At That Chest!' Staten Island Man's Emotional Dunk Over NYPD Car - @TheBuzzeronFOX GMA: Dog passes out from excitment to see owner Baseball Hall of Famers Inducted 'Hunger Games: Mockingjay Part 1' Sneak Peek Florida Keys Webcam Captures Turtles Hatching Morgan Freeman Sucks Down Helium on 'Tonight Show' Robin Wright Can Dance! (WATCH) She's Back! See Paris Hilton's New Carl's Jr. Ad Big Weekend For Atlanta Braves In Cooperstown - @TheBuzzeronFox Chapter Two: Becoming a first-time director What's Got Jack Black Freaking Out at Comic-Con? Doctors Remove 232 Teeth From Teen's Mouth
Parade
Magazine

Click HERE to read all your Parade favorites including Hollywood Wire, Celebrity interviews and photo galleries, Food recipes and cooking tips, Games and lots more.
  • -

     

    March 12, 2010

activity