News From Terre Haute, Indiana

January 27, 2013

Made in Indiana: City companies among first of new initiative

Arthur Foulkes
The Tribune-Star

TERRE HAUTE — A trio of long-time Terre Haute companies — Clabber Girl, Emery Winslow Scale and Glas-Col — are participants in a federally backed manufacturing partnership program.

The Purdue University-based Manufacturing Extension Partnership last March launched “Made in Indiana,” a program designed to call attention to Hoosier manufacturing companies.

More than 100 Indiana companies are on the Made in Indiana list and that number is expected to grow, said Dave Snow, Purdue MEP director.

“We’re really doing it to promote and say, with great pride, that Indiana is a manufacturing state and here are some of the companies that want to be known about,” Snow said. Indiana manufacturers must sign up to be a part of the program, he said.

Companies can sign up through the Purdue MEP webpage, www.mep.pur

due.edu/register.aspx. There is no cost and each company receives a profile page on the website.

“Emery Winslow Scale Co. is pleased to be recognized by Purdue as a ‘Made in Indiana’ manufacturer,” said William Fischer, company president, in an email to the Tribune-Star. “We have a long history in Indiana and we are proud that scales made in our Indiana facility are in service all around the world.”

Emery Winslow Scale’s roots date back to 1896 with Marlon Winslow’s small machine shop in Terre Haute. The company now employs about 35 people at a plant on North 25th Street near Haythorne Avenue. Among other things, their highly durable scales — known as Hydrostatic load cells — measure everything from killer whales and railroad cars to trucks and molten steel and chicken breasts. Their customers include Nestle, General Mills, Pfizer, Boeing, Coca Cola, Republic Services and many more.

All three Made in Indiana companies have deep roots in Terre Haute, dating back several decades.

“We have a great, rich history,” said Teresa Shaffer, executive director of corporate communications at Hulman & Co., maker of Clabber Girl products, including baking powder, baking soda and cornstarch. Being associated with an elite university such as Purdue helps people understand Clabber Girl is also a leader in manufacturing innovations, she said.

Clabber Girl employs more than 200 people in Terre Haute. Its parent company, Hulman & Co., dates back to 1850 in the city. Other Hulman & Co. products include Rex Coffee and OilFlex Oil Stabilizer.

Being known as an Indiana manufacturer could help attract business from other Hoosier firms, said Jim Jacso, director of sales and engineering at Glas-Col, an industrial manufacturer founded in 1939 in the Terre Haute apartment of Glen Morey, who was a research chemist for Commercial Solvents Corp.

Glas-Col, located at Seventh and Hulman streets, employs about 75 people. The company is a leading maker of laboratory products and industrial heating and mixing technology. It serves customers in the pharmaceutical, biotechnology, industrial, semi conductor and research and development industries, according to the company’s website.

According to the most recent data from the National Association of Manufacturers, Indiana is the top manufacturing state in the United States. Manufacturing accounts for more than 25 percent of the goods and services produced in Indiana, far more than the percentages in neighboring Illinois, Ohio, Michigan and Kentucky. Oregon has the second-highest percentage at 20.5 percent. Indiana manufacturers produce chemicals, motor vehicle parts, fabricated metal products, food, beverage and tobacco products and plastics, among other goods.

In terms of employment, Indiana also leads the pack, according to the NAM. Fully 16 percent of Hoosier workers are employed in manufacturing, also the highest percentage in the nation.

The federal government launched the MEP program in the 1990s to help small-to-medium sized companies adopt new technologies. MEP centers, such as the one at Purdue, are funded by fees charged to client companies, which receive advice on diverse topics such as improved manufacturing techniques, energy efficiency and workforce development, Snow said. Federal payments to MEP centers that have operated for more than six years are capped at 33 percent of their budgets, according to a 2012 study by the Congressional Research Service.



Reporter Arthur Foulkes can be reached at (812) 231-4232 or arthur.foulkes@tribstar.com.