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December 10, 2013

Gov. Pence details 2014 education agenda

Wants every Hoosier kid to get ‘fantastic’ education

CORYDON — Now that reform has been implemented, Gov. Mike Pence said Tuesday it’s time for Indiana’s legislature to focus on education innovation.

 Pence’s address on his education agenda for 2014 in Corydon’s First Capitol Building focused on how to make pre-kindergarten education available to poor families, creation of more teacher incentives and finding ways to let charter schools house themselves in vacant public school buildings.

 With a number of students still struggling in the state, he said, the agenda is aimed at continuing the upward trend of Indiana’s test scores and graduation rates. With 200,000 students in underperforming schools and 10,000 graduates in need of remediation in college, Pence thinks the state can do better.

 “I think we can agree that we are not yet educating every Hoosier kid in a fantastic way, so I believe there is still a lot to do,” he said. “That’s why I believe we should pursue bold objectives in this short session of our legislature. We need to encourage innovation and entrepreneurship among our teachers, create incentives for the best charter operators to come to Indiana, free up unused property and create opportunity for students in a tough place, whether they’re 4 years old or 40.”

 But the potential elimination of a revenue stream for school districts — the proposed business personal property tax legislation — leaves superintendents and other district officials concerned about how they’ll foot the bill for some of the governor’s new initiatives.

 State Rep. Terry Goodin, D-Austin, said that in 2012 the business personal property tax generated about $1 billion for local Hoosier communities. If that tax is eliminated, it would not only affect school districts, but constituents may feel the pain instead of businesses.

“If there’s a billion dollars, which is estimated what’s lost, it’s going to be pushed onto local homeowners,” said Goodin, who also is superintendent of Crothersville Community Schools. “It’s going to be a huge tax shift. Instead of saying a ‘tax cut,’ [Pence] probably should use the term ‘tax shift.’ It’s a shift from the corporations to local communities, and that’s going to have a huge impact.

 “A billion dollars is a lot of money.”

 Pence said after his address that with Michigan considering phasing out its business personal property tax, Kentucky’s significantly lower tax and Ohio and Illinois’ absence of it altogether, it’s time for Indiana to look at it, too.

 “As we looked at a broad range of areas of tax reform in Indiana, I just came to the conclusion that phasing out the business personal property tax is an idea whose time has come,” Pence said. “But I think it’s important to do it in a way that doesn’t disadvantage local communities or local schools, and I’m confident that we can do that.”

 State Rep. Ed Clere, R-New Albany, said there’s some risk with eliminating the tax and it needs careful consideration before it’s implemented.

“I’m glad we’re starting to have discussions about the personal property tax. I think we need to approach it cautiously because there is a risk of creating winners and losers,” Clere said. “If we’re going to do something, we need to avoid that. I’d love to eliminate the personal property tax, but I don’t want to do it on the backs of local government. I’m open to looking at any proposal, including the governor’s.

Pence also discussed ways to reward teachers, outside of merit pay, for taking on difficult assignments or finding particularly effective ways to educate students.

He proposed creating a new teacher innovation fund to give grants for teachers who “have the best, scalable ideas for improving student outcomes.” The money could be used for classroom supplies so teachers don’t have to pay out of their own pockets.

He also discussed the possibility of a “Choices for Teachers” program, which would give a stipend to teachers who elect to teach in underperforming schools or charter schools with a high percentage of poor students. Goodin said he thinks the governor’s proposal to spend more money in charter schools with poor students speaks volumes about the move to support them in the last 15 years.

 “To do that is basically ceding the fact that their experiment over the last decade and a half has been a failure,” Goodin said. “The Democrats, what we’ve preached for and asked for the last decade and a half is trying to properly fund public schools and properly fund traditional schools. He has finally come over to that idea and [has] really seen the light now.”

 Clere said he sees things much differently because districts, charter and private schools all have their share of low-income students.

“I support school choice, including access to public charters and private schools,” Clere said, “but not at the expense of public education. Many disadvantaged students have gained access to educational opportunities that were previously unavailable to them as a result of the charter and voucher initiatives.”

On another topic, Pence said with some districts spending as much as $25 million to maintain vacant properties, he’d like to create a council to look at vacant properties statewide and figure out how to make it possible for charter schools to lease them.

Pence also said he’s not sure what a program for implementing pre-kindergarten education across the state would look like, but there are several options he’d like the legislature to consider.

“First you decide where you ought to go and then you decide how you’re going to get there,” Pence said. “I just came to the conclusion after traveling and visiting some extraordinary pre-K programs in the state of Indiana, that our state should make a commitment to open the way for pre-K education to disadvantaged kids.”

Whether that’s implemented through a voucher program for families below the 150 percent poverty lines or other means, he thinks it would help those students — who seem to perform at a lower level than other students — succeed in their education.

Clapp writes for the News and Tribune in Jeffersonville, Ind.

 

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