News From Terre Haute, Indiana

Local & Bistate

July 20, 2013

State delays new school law

Legislation calls for remediation for students who aren’t college ready

INDIANAPOLIS — The Indiana State Board of Education has voted to delay full implementation of a new law that requires high schools to provide remediation to students to who aren’t college-ready before they graduate.

The law, House Enrolled Act 1005, would have required schools to start identifying 11th graders this coming school year who are at risk of failing their senior-year graduation exams or need remedial classes before beginning college work for credit. The law would have also required high schools to start providing extra help to those students in their senior year.

But the board voted Thursday to narrow the scope of the law to a small group of students this coming school year to give the state Department of Education more time to come up with a plan to implement the law in full.

“I think schools will welcome the extra time,” said Superintendent of Public Instruction Glenda Ritz.

The law was prompted by research that shows a significant number of Indiana high schools graduates, including those who graduated with academic honors, have to take basic remediation courses in math and English when they go to college.

Every year, more than 10,000 college freshman who’ve graduated from Indiana high schools are required to take remedial classes that give them no college credits but cost the same as a for-credit course, according to the Indiana Commission on Higher Education.

In 2011, the latest year available, the commission found that more 40 percent of Indiana high school students who graduated with a college-preperatory Core 40 degree had to remedial classes in college. For students who graduated with a general degree, it was 83 percent. Seven percent of high school students with an academic honors degree had to take remedial classes in college.

Ritz said she recognized the “disconnect” on college readiness, but said the DOE needed more time to decide what kind of assessment test to put into place and what kind of remedial curriculum would be appropriate.

Indiana Gov. Mike Pence has been a supporter of the new remediation law and proponent of doing more to boost the college-readiness of Indiana students. His new education policy adviser, Claire Fiddian-Green, was at the board meeting but declined to comment on the board’s decision. She said she wasn’t authorized to speak to the media.

Sixteen Indiana high schools are involved in a pilot project using Accuplacer, the standard assessment test used by the state’s universities to determine if students are ready for college-level math and English. But Ritz said she’s not sure if Accuplacer is the best tool for the state’s high schools to use.

For the coming school year, schools will only need to provide remediation for students who fail twice to pass the end-course assessment test in algebra. Ritz said the DOE will have a plan by next April for how to implement the law for other students.

Ritz also expressed concerns about the lack of funding to implement the new remediation law and said the DOE needed more time to help schools figure out its fiscal impact. In passing the legislation, the General Assembly provided no additional dollars to schools for the testing and remediation of students. Leglistators who supported the law said they expected schools would be able to use their existing resources.  

Maureen Hayden covers the Statehouse for the CNHI newspapers, the Tribune-Star’s parent company. She can be reached at maureen.hayden@indianamediagroup.com.

1
Text Only | Photo Reprints
Local & Bistate
Latest News
TribStar.com Poll
AP Video
Last Mass Lynching in U.S. Remains Unsolved Raw: Fight Breaks Out in Ukraine Parliament Robot Parking Valet Creates Stress-free Travel Raw: MH17 Bodies Arrive in Netherlands Raw: Truck, Train Crash Leads to Fireball Disabled Veterans Memorial Nearing Completion Home-sharing Programs Help Seniors Ex-NYC Mayor: US Should Allow Flights to Israel Bodies of Malaysia Jet Victims Leave Ukraine Plane Crashes in Taiwan, Dozens Feared Dead Republicans Hold a Hearing on IRS Lost Emails 98-Year-Old Woman Left in Parked Truck Raw: Mourners Gather As MH17 Bodies Transported Judge Ponders Overturning Colo. Gay Marriage Ban Raw: Plane Lands on New York Highway Clinton: "AIDS-Free Generation Within Our Reach" Broncos Owner Steps Down Due to Alzheimer's Trump: DC Hotel Will Be Among World's Best Raw: MD Church Built in 1773 Ravaged by Fire Courts Conflicted Over Healthcare Law
NDN Video
LeBron James -- Dropped $2k On Cupcake Apology ... Proceeds To Benefit Charity Snoop Dogg Says He Smoked Weed at the White House Raw: Fight Breaks Out in Ukraine Parliament Chris Pratt Interrupts Interview To French Braid Intern's Hair Shirtless Super Mario Balotelli Dances While Ironing - @TheBuzzeronFOX Whoa! Watch "Housewives" Star Do the Unthinkable LeBron apologizes to neighbors with cupcakes Justin Bieber In Calvin Klein Underwear Shoot Samsung Pre-Trolls The IPhone 6 With New Ad Jimmy Kimmel Introduces His Baby Girl Swim Daily, Nina Agdal in the Cook Islands Guilty Dog Apologizes to Baby for Stealing Her Toy Prince George Turns 1 and is Already a Trendsetter Train Collides With Semi Truck Carrying Lighter Fluid Kanye West Tells-All on Wedding in "GQ" Interview Tony Dungy Weighs in on Michael Sam Scarlett Johansson Set To Marry In August New Star Wars Episode XII X-Wing Revealed Obama: Putin must push separatists to aid MH17 probe Michigan inmates no longer allowed to wear orange due to 'OITNB'
Parade
Magazine

Click HERE to read all your Parade favorites including Hollywood Wire, Celebrity interviews and photo galleries, Food recipes and cooking tips, Games and lots more.
  • -

     

    March 12, 2010

activity