News From Terre Haute, Indiana

September 10, 2013

LIZ CIANCONE: Game used ad slogans to craft good stories

Liz Ciancone
Special to the Tribune-Star

---- — Years ago I received a special game for Christmas.

Each player got a sheet of advertising slogans which could be torn off and, with the application of the tongue, the individual slogans could be made sticky enough to adhere to a sheet of blank paper. The idea was to use the slogans, add a few of your own words and string it all together to create a story. Each player worked individually and, when time was called, each read their story aloud.

My problem was then I couldn’t find anyone who wanted to play. I really liked word games, but it was an enthusiasm not shared by Ed or by any other of my nearest and dearest.

I mentioned the game to a friend not long ago, and we spent an entertaining few minutes trying to recall some of the advertising slogans of yesteryear, many of them featured in my Christmas game.

Do we even have advertising slogans now? We have advertising spokespersons, but I can’t think of anything other than “the pause that refreshes.” Or, is that also an old slogan no longer in use?

Does anyone remember “99 and 100th% pure, it floats” and the product it promoted? My game had that one and “when better cars are built, Buick will build them.” This was offset by Packard who advised the motoring public to “ask the man who owns one.”

There were slogans for toothpaste, too. I bought Ipana which promised “the smile of beauty,” but I didn’t buy the smile, I bought it because Ipana sponsored Fred Allen’s radio program and I thought Fred Allen was the funniest man alive. Ipana’s competitor countered with “you’ll wonder where the yellow went when you brush your teeth with Pepsodent.”

Incidentally, Ipana tasted terrible, which may explain why I haven’t seen it on the shelves in years. Pepsodent, however, is still going strong.

I can still rattle off the six flavors of Jello, the original six, but I cannot recall the slogan. It seemed as if everything was sold with a memorable slogan, most were included in my game. They could make some pretty funny stories, if I do say so myself.

I don’t remember what happened to that game. Probably it was left behind in one of our moves. I wish I had that game back. I’d probably still be playing it by myself, but I’d still enjoy it.



Liz Ciancone is a retired Tribune-Star reporter.