News From Terre Haute, Indiana

April 12, 2012

ISU Wind Orchestra to present an All American Concert


Special to the Tribune-Star

TERRE HAUTE — An All American Concert featuring the Indiana State University Wind Orchestra is planned for 7:30 p.m. Friday at Tilson Auditorium on the ISU campus.

This is the wind orchestra’s closing concert of the season and will feature music composed by some of the most important and influential American composers in history.

The concert is free and will include “Fanfare for the Common Man” by Aaron Copland. It was composed in 1942 and was written to foster the American spirit in a time of war and sacrifice. The selection reflects the nobility, strength and fortitude of the common American.

Also part of the performance will be “New England Triptych” (pronounced trip-tick), composed by the powerful American composer and teacher William Schuman in 1956 and based on church and patriotic songs written by American Revolutionary songwriter William Billings.

The first movement, “Be Glad Then, America,” celebrates America’s bounty, and Schuman’s setting is celebratory of the gifts God gave America.

The gentle tones of the second movement, “When Jesus Wept,” constitute a gesture of simple blessing and reverence.

The final movement, “Chester,” is a church hymn that was used by the Continental Army of the American Colonies as a marching song and combines the religious and patriotic elements of the previous two movements.

Also part of the concert is “An American Elegy,” written by a new American composer, Frank Tichelli. The piece is, above all, an expression of hope. It was composed in memory of those who lost their lives at Columbine High School on April 20, 1999, and to honor the survivors.

It is offered as a tribute to their strength and courage in the face of a tragedy and serves as a reminder of how fragile and precious life is and how intimately connected are all human beings.

Composer Henry Fillimore had a career that spanned more than 50 years and was one of America’s most prolific composers of “the march.” It is estimated that he wrote 250 original compositions for band.

“The Klaxon” was written in March of 1929 for the opening of the Cincinnati Automobile Show and bears the subtitle March of the Automobiles. It was inspired by the U.S. auto industry.