News From Terre Haute, Indiana

Community News Network

August 5, 2013

Are growing pains real?

NEW YORK — I'm lucky: When I hear the phrase "growing pains," I think of Kirk Cameron, not night aches. I never suffered from growing pains as a child, and as far as I can tell, my 2-year-old doesn't have them yet either. So sometimes I wonder: Are growing pains real? If so, what causes them? And how do I make sure my kid never has them, because I really don't need another reason for screamy 3 a.m. wake-ups?

Growing pains are real — in fact, they're pretty common. Estimates vary, but one Australian study found that as many as 37 percent of 4-to-6-year-olds experience these recurring aches, which typically afflict a child's lower limbs in the afternoon or at night. Bizarrely, though, growing pains actually have nothing to do with growing — more on that later. And while they are nothing to worry about and usually disappear by the age of 14, growing pains can be confused with more serious health problems — so it's good to know what they are and what they aren't.

The term "growing pains" first appeared in a book penned in 1823 by a French doctor, but since then physicians have realized that the peak of these pains, which is at around age 6, doesn't correspond to a period of rapid growth. (A quarter of a person's total growth actually happens during puberty). So it's unlikely that growth has anything to do with growing pains, at least directly. But despite attempts to come up with more accurate monikers (such as "noninflammatory pain syndrome of early childhood"), the old name stuck.

How frequently kids experience growing pains varies — some never get them, others get them five times a year, and a handful of poor souls have them every night. But timingwise, there are a few general rules. First, growing pains usually first appear during the preschool years. "If a child is 8 and all of a sudden has pain at night, it is not growing pains," explains Barbara Ostrov, a pediatric rheumatologist at Penn State University. Second, growing pains only happen in the afternoon or at night, so kids who complain of pain during the day or who wake up stiff or sore in the morning are almost certainly not experiencing growing pains. Most of the time, the pains disappear by around age 14, but some kids will have them throughout their teen-age years.

Text Only | Photo Reprints
Community News Network
Latest News
TribStar.com Poll
AP Video
Raw: Israel Bombs Multiple Targets in Gaza UN Security Council Calls for MH 17 Crash Probe Veteran Creates Job During High Unemployment Obama Bestows Medal of Honor on NH Veteran Raw: Cargo Craft Undocks From Space Station New Orleans Plans to Recycle Cigarette Butts Raw: Black Boxes of Downed Jetliner Turned Over Raw: Plane Lands on New York Highway Hopkins to Pay $190M After Pelvic Exams Taped Widow: Jury Sent Big Tobacco a $23B Message Texas Sending National Guard Troops to Border Raw: 25 Family Members Killed in Gaza Airstrike AP Exclusive: American Beaten in Israel Speaks Diplomacy Intensifies Amid Mounting Gaza Toll Raw: International Team Inspects MH17 Bodies Foxx Cites Washington 'Circus Mirror' 'Weird Al' Is Wowed by Album's Success Raw: Gaza Rescuers Search Rubble for Survivors WWII Vet Gets Medals, 70 Years Late Bull Run Comes to Middle America
NDN Video
Samsung Pre-Trolls The IPhone 6 With New Ad Prince George Turns 1 and is Already a Trendsetter Guilty Dog Apologizes to Baby for Stealing Her Toy Train Collides With Semi Truck Carrying Lighter Fluid Kanye West Tells-All on Wedding in "GQ" Interview Tony Dungy Weighs in on Michael Sam Scarlett Johansson Set To Marry In August New Star Wars Episode XII X-Wing Revealed Obama: Putin must push separatists to aid MH17 probe Michigan inmates no longer allowed to wear orange due to 'OITNB' Adam Levine Ties the Knot Sebastian The Ibis Walks Beautiful Bride Down The Aisle | ACC Must See Moment NASA Ceremony Honors Moon Walker Neil Armstrong Faces of Souls Lost in Malaysian Plane Crash 105-year-old woman throws first pitch Man Creates Spreadsheet of Wife's Reasons for Turning Down Sex 'Weird Al' Is Wowed by Album's Success Rory McIlroy struggles, surges, wins British Open NOW TRENDING: Real life Pac-Man Explosions as hot air balloon crashes in Clinton
Parade
Magazine

Click HERE to read all your Parade favorites including Hollywood Wire, Celebrity interviews and photo galleries, Food recipes and cooking tips, Games and lots more.
  • -

     

    March 12, 2010

activity